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Weighing the New Generation of Weight Loss Pills one against the Other

Posted by Mr. Hachis | On: Oct 14 2010

What makes the dieting industry so huge? If you think about it, there are ways in which the industry that sells weight loss techniques bears a certain resemblance to the industry that sells ageing management and beauty. Two out of three people in this country are overweight in one form or another, and there is a whole spectrum of industry-approved ways of addressing the problem. As long as they have been around, people are beginning to see that fitness programs and diet books are just old-fashioned and laborious. The personal responsibility these methods require in your participation can easily seem a little old-fashioned for its time. New generation weight loss pills are beginning to take up a great deal of the attention of the overweight - in a way that more hands-on methods were accepted at one time. Let's try to evaluate the claims made for these remedies.

The thing is, the advertising claims they make for weight loss pills are often more sophisticated than the product they sell; the unnatural assumptions they make, often just barely keep on the right side of the law, and can often appear to promise much more than they could possibly deliver. What they don't tell you is, is that weight loss pills only make for a great supplement to your regular and diet and exercise regime. They are not a substitute for real effort by any stretch of the imagination.

Let's look at how a few of the most recently approved over-the-counter obesity drugs promise you something for nothing. To begin with, these aren't for people who are just a few pounds overweight, and are looking for a quick fix. For the most part, weight loss pills are for the truly obese - people with a body mass index that goes higher than 25, or even 30. You have to have a serious problem on your hands to need a solution as serious as a weight loss pill.

Let's start with the popular drug Meridia. This is a formulation that belongs to the class of weight loss aids known asappetite suppressants. What it does is, it makes you feel quite full - even when you've only a little food. It affects the way the brain looks at the amount of food on your plate, and in you. As in crazy as this sounds though, for almost all people who try Meridia, they lose no more than 6% of their body weight. And of course, there are the side effects - you get a nasty case of high blood pressure when you use this. And like every other appetite suppressant, Meridia will have you twitchy and on edge all day in addition.

The next one up is Alli. These weight loss pills don't suppress your appetite in any way. You could eat as much as the want; but the fat in your food is something Alli will make sure your body will never actually see. When you take these over-the-counter weight loss pills, or even Xenical, the industrial-strength version of this drug, right before a meal, your body succeeds in treating the fat in your food somewhat diffrently. It makes your body reject the fat and drain it out. How successful is it? Half of all people who try this drug, and who also exercise and diet properly, notice some improvement. But it isn't a big enough one that you would want to drop everything right now to get this drug. So where does all this fat you eat actually go, if Alli makes your body not absorb it?
It goes out the backdoor of course; but all this fat on its way out is kind of an unnatural thing, and your body will react with anal leakage. Of all the weight loss pills there are out there, this one icould qualify perhaps, as the safest. It doesn't do anything to the brain to achieve its results - it only deals with the body. But while it stops the body from absorbing fat, an unfortunate side effect this has, is where it starves the body of all the vitamins it needs too. So you'd need supplemental multivitamins to go along with it.

Conjugated Linoleic Acid is another over-the-counter approach, that claims to put you in your thin pants before long. It claims to succeed at burning up your body fat to help build muscle.

All these drugs use a way of tricking the body into doing something - for its own good. It's a sad commentary on human nature, that we would rather choose to trick the body, than take responsibility for more healthy approach to life.

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